Spanning Tree Protocol

Spanning Tree Protocol

About this paper

Spanning-Tree Protocol (STP) is designed to prevent problems related to bridging loops.

It solves the issue by blocking redundant paths and allowing only a single active path. STP works by choosing a root switch then selecting a loop free path from the root switch to every other switch. To do that, spanning tree must elect a single root bridge, one root port for each non-root switch, and a single designated port for each network segment.

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Amer Bi Di Transceivers

Amer Bi Di Transceivers

About this paper

Double your data throughput with the AMR-GLC-BX-U/D BI-DI Transceiver!

The AMR-GLC-BX-U is a bi-directional SFP single mode transceiver. Using the AMR-GLC-BX-U (upstream) in conjunction with the AMR-GLC-BX-D (downstream) will allow connectivity using only one fiber strand. Practical applications include the ability to double throughput through an existing fiber pair without the need of running new fiber and the ability to make use of a fiber pair that has one damaged strand.
How does it work? The AMR-GLC-BX-U transmits data on a 1310-nm wavelength and receives at 1490-nm whereas the AMR-GLC-BX-D transmits on 1490-nm and receives on the 1310-nm wavelength. With this technology, fiber connectivity can be achieved using a single fiber strand instead of the tradition pair. The AMR-GLC-BX-U/D is also the perfect solution in a case where one fiber strand is damaged within your fiber pair.

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Static Routing on Amer Networks Switches in Comparison with Cisco Switches

Static Routing on Amer Networks Switches in Comparison with Cisco Switches

About this paper

Implementation of a static route on an Amer Switch is accomplished by executing the static route command:+

Switch(config)#ip route

“DestinationNetwork” “Subnet” “NextHopAddress“

The command is similar to the Cisco IOS command. The difference lies in the definition of the port in the Amer Switch. In a Cisco network implementation (See Above), in order to allow communication between two subnets connected to independent switches, a static route must be created. The two ports that join Switch0 and Switch1 would be changed to a router port with the execution of the ‘no switchport’ command and an IP address would then be assigned to the ports.

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Extending wireless to remote campus locations

Extending wireless to remote campus locations

The Challenge:Exponential growth in network & wireless usage at a small-to-mid size school districts

  • Less than 5,000 students / faculty, at 3 – 12 locations
  • Mandatory on-line testing, on-line curricula, on-line learning management, etc. all drive need for increased LAN and wireless capacity
  • Growth in student end-user devices requiring various bands and channels of operation

All these drive requirement for upgraded wireless and supporting Ethernet switching. But replacing and/or upgrading wireless at all location requires $100,000+ budget.

The Solution:Using Amer Networks Cloud Command network management system and Enterprise grade wireless access points on a campus-by-campus basis.

  • Amer Networks distributed Layer 2 PoE switching
  • WAP334N and WAP 444AC and OWL-300 (outdoor) wireless access points
  • Amer Cloud Command (Amazon cloud) wireless network management system

Amer’s integrated wireless solution provides:

  • Premier quality LAN switching systems with Cisco-interoperable / programmable standards,
  • 100% warranted for life, with all programming upgrades and support included in the initial procurement budget (fixed TCO for lifecycle of network),

Dual-band, enterprise-grade wireless access points

  • High performance, extended range hardware platform featuring dual 802.11n radios with 2×2 MIMO, high gain internal antennas for data rates of 300 Mbps on each radio via Gigabit Ethernet link. Full 802.3af PoE compliant for easy installa­tion.

Cloud Command management:

  • Four SSID per radio; enable multiple networks primary, secondary, staff and visitor networks
  • Concurrent, remote management of multiple customer sites
  • Simplified deployment via self-configuration for full automated implementation
  • Enhanced security with WPA2-PSK + IDA
  • Multi-location roaming
  • Real-time performance reporting and alerting
  • Compliance logging
  • Intuitive, G.U.I. (see above) enables immediate usability

As an indicative example, at a 6-campus, 3,000-student network environment, the Amer WAP / Cloud Command system will support 2,500 end-user devices with a network topology as follows:

  • SS2GR26ip _ Layer 2 24-port gigabit switches with full PoE (+500W) _ One (1) at each site supporting a maximum of 24 WAP units
  • Average 15 WAP334NC wireless access points per location estimated
  • 4-Year Cloud Command network management license fee

Indicative total cost of ownership (TCO) over a 4-Year operation planning budget, including all switching and wireless access point hardware, all Cloud Command network management software costs (hardware and software), all system maintenance, support and upgrades for the lifecycle of the wireless network: $7,100 per campus location.

Brigham Young University

Brigham Young University

In 2012, Brigham Young University’s Chemistry faculty faced the challenge described above. Network throughput demands had doubled in 2 years, and were projected to increase exponentially. A nationally recognized education leader since 1875, BYU’s 34,000 students receive the very best of education and resources available anywhere in the nation.BYU executive leadership is determined to maintain this standard. Robert Paxman, Academic Systems Administrator, was charged with upgrading the network infrastructure within the research department of the University. The legacy Cisco 4500-based network had been designated end-of-life and, therefore not supportable over the 6-year planning window. The broad requirements were

  • a network “refresh” to a minimum 20-gigabit backbone;
  • 20 gigabit uplink to the data center;
  • 10 gigabit connectivity to IDF closets, supporting approx. 2,000 ports.

A key executive consideration was extendibility, eliminating “dead-end investment” and fixing operational costs. “No budget surprises” was the prime executive directive. I.T. standards and procurement practices required a minimum of three (3) vendor “proof-of-concept” and accompanying fixed cost quotations. Mr. Paxman was unaware of Amer Networks, but was immediately intrigued by the distributed “Spine and Leaf” architecture Amer submitted. Amer implemented a 60-day on-site verification system. During this process, Amer demonstrated three critical enhancements that exceeded BYU base requirements:

  • Core network capacity at 40 Gbps, extensible to 160 Gbps with only simple component addition, (requiring no system decommissioning, re-configuration or re-deployment);
  • Spine & Leaf architecture enables critical performance increases:
  • Higher available bandwidth
  • Built in redundancy
  • Shorter paths between destination (lower latency), enabling near wire speed data transfer between nodes.

Spine & Leaf opens lowest-cost, least-overhead network expansion pathway for 6-8 year network planning process.

Case-Study-Brigham-Young-University.pdf (779 downloads)